Privacy and Security Threat Models and Mitigation Strategies of Older Adults (SOUPS ’19)

AbstractOlder adults (65+) are becoming primary users of emerging smart systems, especially in health care. However, these technologies are often not designed for older users and can pose serious privacy and security concerns due to their novelty, complexity, and propensity to collect and communicate vast amounts of sensitive information. Efforts to address such concerns must build on an in-depth understanding of older adults’ perceptions and preferences about data privacy and…

Privacy Attitudes of Smart Speaker Users (PETS ’19)

AbstractAs devices with always-on microphones located in people’s homes, smart speakers have significant privacy implications. We surveyed smart speaker owners about their beliefs, attitudes, and concerns about the recordings that are made and shared by their devices. To ground participants’ responses in concrete interactions, rather than collecting their opinions abstractly, we framed our survey around randomly selected recordings of saved interactions with their devices. We surveyed 116 owners of Amazon…

Information Design in An Aged Care Context (PervasiveHealth ’19)

AbstractThe adoption of technological solutions for aged care is rapidly increasing in developed countries. New technologies facilitate the sharing of health information among the “care triad”: the elderly care recipient, their family, and care staff. In order to develop user-centered technologies for this population, we believe that it is necessary to first examine their views about the sharing of health and well-being information (HWBI). Through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 12…

“What Can’t Data Be Used For?” Privacy Expectations about Smart TVs in the U.S. (EuroUSEC ’18)

Abstract Smart TVs have rapidly become the most common smart appliance in typical households. In the U.S., most television sets on the market have advanced sensors not traditionally found on conventional TVs, such as a microphone for voice commands or a camera for photo or video input. These new sensors enable features that are convenient, but they may also introduce new privacy implications. We surveyed 591 U.S. Internet users about…

Information Disclosure Concerns in The Age of Wearable Computing (USEC ’16)

Abstract Wearable devices, or “wearables,” bring great benefits but also potential information disclosure risks that could expose users’ activities without their awareness or consent. We surveyed 1,782 Internet users about various data associated with the capabilities of popular wearable devices on the market to identify the data disclosure scenarios that users find most concerning. Our study relatively ranks potential data capture scenarios enabled by wearables and investigates the impact of…

Somebody’s Watching Me? Assessing the Effectiveness of Webcam Indicator Lights (CHI ’15)

Abstract Most laptops and personal computers have webcams with LED indicators to notify users when they are recording. Because hackers use surreptitiously captured webcam recordings to extort users, we explored the effectiveness of these indicators under varying circumstances and how they could be improved.  We observed that, on average, fewer than half of our participants (45%) noticed the existing indicator during computer-based tasks.  When seated in front of the computer…

Is This Thing On? Crowdsourcing Privacy Indicators for Ubiquitous Sensing Platforms (CHI ’15)

Abstract We are approaching an environment where ubiquitous computing devices will constantly accept input via audio and video channels: kiosks that determine demographic information of passersby, gesture controlled home entertainment systems and audio controlled wearable devices are just a few examples. To enforce the principle of least privilege, recent proposals have suggested technical approaches to limit third-party applications to receiving only the data they need, rather than entire audio or…